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Book Review: North American Wildlife Policy and Law


North American Wildlife Policy and Law. Bruce D. Leopold, James L. Cummins & Winifred B. Kessler. Boone and Crockett Club. 2018. Hardcover, 480 pages, 200 photos and graphs – 203 x 254 x 40.64mm (8 x 10 inches). ISBN 978-1-940860-27-5 and ISBN10 194086027X. $95 hard cover edition; $80 eBook. Available at B&C online bookstoreREAD MORE

Abstracts Of Recently Published Papers On Hunting


In this section we will inform you periodically on interesting peer reviewed scientific papers on hunting and conservation. Usually we give you the title of the paper, the authors and an abstract, as well as a direct link to the paper and/or publisher.

Please note that the opinion expressed and the conclusions drawn in these papers do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher and editors of Conservation Frontlines.READ MORE

The State of Conservation in Oklahoma’s Most Rural Counties

The State of Conservation in Oklahoma’s Most Rural Counties


Natural Beauty Marred by Carelessness

Tucked away in the southeastern corner of the state lies Oklahoma’s most diverse terrain. From the pine-covered Kiamichi and Ouachita mountains to the hardwood bottoms and swamps along the Red River, this unique area is home to everything from black bear to alligator.READ MORE

Like the Stars. As New West meets Old West, conflict is the norm. It doesn’t have to be.


The 1990 classic “Dances with Wolves” features a scene in which the main character, Lieutenant John Dunbar, played by Kevin Costner, shares a campfire with Lakota Sioux medicine man Kicking Bird, played by Graham Greene. As the wind blows through a grove of cottonwood trees, the two ponder the impending wave of emigrants. READ MORE

The Shangani Sanctuary Vulture Restaurant – What’s good for the vulture is good for the hyena — and much more


In his 1987 book The World of Shooting, Peter Johnson described the Mbembezi District of Matabeleland, Zimbabwe, 70 years ago, as a countryside dotted with settlements and villages surrounded by crops, their livestock herded by day and kraaled at night. Thanks to the crops, gamebirds flourished around these villages and, in the land between them, wildlife thrived undisturbed and unhindered, in harmony with humans. Man’s activities and Nature’s wellbeing seemed to be in balance . . .READ MORE