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Protectionist NGOs Obstruct Real Conservation–And the Dunning-Kruger Effect keeps them in power


Through social media, protectionist NGOs are flourishing. Anti-hunting groups broadly refuse—or refute—scientific research and often ignore socio-economic factors while collecting millions in donations and saddling range states and rural communities with high conservation costs. It doesn’t have to be this way.READ MORE

Trophy Hunting Bans Imperil Biodiversity


International scientists—many of them non-hunters—argue there is compelling evidence that ending trophy hunting risks land conversion and biodiversity loss. Trophy hunting can provide income for marginalized and impoverished rural communities. Effective hunting reforms should be prioritized over bans.READ MORE

Hunting & Social Media: Namibia Has a Position on That–Today’s hunters must take the Worldwide Web into account


Social media posts of happy hunters with dead animals often dismay anti-hunters and non-hunters alike, with predictable negative consequences. Namibia’s Ministry of Tourism and Environment, which regulates that country’s safari trade, has said it wants to ban such posts outright. NAPHA, Namibia’s professional hunting body, has countered with a social-media code of conduct. All hunters everywhere should think long and hard before publicizing trophy photos.READ MORE

Momentum for Community-Based Conservation in Southern Africa Continues with Namibia’s Conservancy Forum


Community-based natural resource management must make a positive impact on livelihoods and good governance is essential for the future of successful community development and wildlife conservation in NamibiaREAD MORE

The Dilemmas of Wildlife Management–Human stewardship is a matter of perspective as well as needs


Over-population of certain wildlife species threatens habitat conservation and the survival of other species. How to deal with this issue is often a matter of value judgement and perspectives; science-based wildlife management offers solutions.READ MORE